Searchable abstracts of presentations at key conferences in oncology
Volume 1 | PacRim7

7th International Pacific Rim (PacRim) Breast and Prostate Cancer Meeting


17 Mar 2019 - 20 Mar 2019

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7th PacRim Meeting Poster Presentations

(1)

S phase dysregulation occurs following resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition ER+ breast cancer
1Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, New South Wales 2010, Australia; 2St. Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; 3Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals Inc., Dundee DD1 5JJ, UK.
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BMP4 is a bonafide breast cancer metastasis suppressor
1Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA; 2School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 3Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Australia; 4Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; 5La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; 6Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Heidelberg, Australia.
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Using coordination chemistry and nanotechnology to develop a brand new class of therapeutics
1Department of Experimental Therapeutics, BC Cancer-Vancouver Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 5Cuprous Pharmaceuticals Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
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A GWAS identified functional variation in PSA (KLK3) gene that confers lower risk is also associated with more aggressive disease and lower survival in men with prostate cancer
1Cancer Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre – Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia; 3Anatomical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Queensland, Australia; 4Department of Genetics and Epidemiology, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK; 5Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Surgery (Urology Service) and Medicine (Genitourinary Oncology), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA; 6Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 7Department of Clinical Chemistry, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 8Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Cambridge, UK.
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Expression of the interleukin-3/receptor complex by breast cancer cells promotes vascular mimicry via a PI3K-dependent mechanism and is associated with poor outcome
1Centre for Cancer Biology, University of South Australia and SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2BreastScreen SA and SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Adelaide Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4Peter MacCallum Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 5Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 6CSL Limited, Bio21 Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 7The Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia ; 8The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 9Garvan Institute of Medical Research and St.Vincent’s Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia.
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ROCK educates cancer-associated fibroblasts via secreted Creld2 to create a tumour-promoting microenvironment
Centre for Cancer Biology, University of South Australia and SA Pathology, Adelaide, Australia.
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Estrogen receptor positive luminal progenitors the cancer cell origin for Estrogen receptor positive breast cancer
1Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 2Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Australia; 3Cancer Development and Treatment, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 4Immune Signaling Laboratories, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Australia; 5La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; 6Centre for Micro-Photonics, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Australia; 7Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; 8The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; 9Metastasis Research Laboratory, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Heidelberg, Australia; 10Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
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Mechanisms underlying uncontrolled genome doubling in breast cancer
1The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; 2Children’s Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia; 3Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia; 4Cytogenetics, Monash Pathology, Monash Medical Centre, Victoria 3168, Australia; 5St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065, Australia; 6Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3010, Australia; 7ANZAC Research Institute, Concord, New South Wales 2139, Australia; 8The University of Sydney Concord Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health Concord, New South Wales 2139, Australia; 9St. Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia.
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Targeting stromal remodelling and cancer stem cell plasticity overcomes chemoresistance in metastatic triple negative breast cancer
1The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia; 2The Chris O’ Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia; 3Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia; 4St Vincent’s Hospital, 2010 Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 5Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute Cancer Program, Monash University, Clayton, Australia; 6Tumour Microenvironment Laboratory, Centre for Cancer Biology, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 7Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. *These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Epi-transcriptomic alterations in ER-positive breast cancer
Endocrine Oncology Research Group, Department of Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, Ireland.
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The WinPro study: A window of opportunity study of endocrine therapy with and without prometrium in postmenopausal women with early stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer
1Garvan Research Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 5Walter+Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 6Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratory, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
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Targeting AR in endocrine-resistant breast cancer
1Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; 3Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
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Single cell transcriptome analysis reveals human prostate cancer cells upregulate retinoic acid signalling in response to androgen withdrawal
1Monash Partners Comprehensive Cancer Consortium, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute Cancer Program, Prostate Cancer Research Group, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia; 2Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia; 3Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia; 4Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia; 5Prostate Cancer Research Program, Cancer Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia; 6Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; 7Computational Cancer Biology Program, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia; 8TissuPath, Mount Waverley, Victoria, 3149, Australia; 9School of Clinical Sciences, Department of Medicine, Monash University, Victoria 3168, Australia; Prostate Cancer Research Program, Cancer Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia; 10Department of Surgery, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia; 11Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
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Nuclear ErbB-2 activity modulates the interferon signaling pathway in breast cancer cells resistant to anti-ErbB-2 therapies
1Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Buenos Aires Argentina; 2Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, School of Medicine, AHMS, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.
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Combinatorial co-targeting by miRNAs: a subtle but strong regulator of epithelia-mesenchymal transitions
1Bioinformatics Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; 2Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia; 3Centre for Cancer Biology, an Alliance of SA Pathology and University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 5The University of Melbourne, Department of Surgery, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC 3065, Australia; 6Systems Biology Laboratory, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia; 7ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia; 8School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia; 9Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia.
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AR chromatin binding is reprogrammed in the absence of FOXA1 in ER- breast cancers
1Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, School of Medicine, AHMS, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 2Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0RE, UK; 3Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0XZ, UK.
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Loss of FAM3B promotes prostate cancer progression by modulating glucose metabolism
1Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 2Department of Urologic Sciences, Vancouver Prostate Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3Department of Pathology, Tulane University School of Medicine, Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 4Department of Urology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 5Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Alkek Center for Molecular Discovery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
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Assessing alterations in organelle contacts during prostate cancer development
1Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK; 2South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia.
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Circular RNAs add further diversity to AR isoform repertoire
1Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 3Department of Urologic Sciences, Vancouver Prostate Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Department of Urology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. *Presenter
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Estrogen receptor alpha controls gene expression via translational offsetting
1Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Prostate Cancer Translational Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, 3000, Australia; 3Cancer Program, Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia; 4Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia; 5Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Münster, Germany; 6Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 7Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 8Lady Davis Institute, Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology and Departments of Biochemistry and Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3T1E2, Canada.
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Characterisation of developmental pathways that drive metastatic progression of breast cancer at single cell resolution
1Histone Variant Group, Genomics and Epigenetics Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research. Sydney, NSW Australia; 2St. Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Garvan-Weizmann Centre for Cellular Genomics, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Current: Institute for Biomedical Materials and Devices, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5Tumour Development Group, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Invasion and Metastasis Laboratory, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 7Cancer Biology Laboratory, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
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The Myoepithelium as a Risk Predictor in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast
1Westmead Clinical School, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, Westmead, 2145 Australia; 2Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead, 2145, Australia.
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Estrogen receptor regulated miR-342 suppresses a pro-metastatic gene network
1Centre for Cancer Biology – An Alliance between SA Pathology and the University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
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A molecular portrait of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in prostate cancer progression
1Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 3Glycation and Diabetic Complications Group, Mater Research Institute, Translational Research Institute, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 4Tissue Repair and Regeneration Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 5Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
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Estrogen maintains mammographic density via heparanase mediated induction of SDC-1 and -4
1Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia; 2Translational Research Institute, Queensland, Australia; 3Radiology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland, Australia; 4School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia; 5Dame Rome Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; 6School of Biomedical Science, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia. # Denotes equal shared last author.
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Immune signalling is a key driver of breast density and breast cancer risk
1Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Adelaide, Woodville, Australia; 2The Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; 3Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; 4The University of Melbourne Department of Surgery, St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 5Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; 6The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 7Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology and Translational Research Institute, Queensland, Australia; 8School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA, Australia; 9MRC and University of Edinburgh Centre for Reproductive Health, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
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Androgen receptor binding sites are highly mutated in prostate cancer
1School of Medicine, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey; 2College of Engineering, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Vancouver Prostate Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
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New combination therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer
1Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute Cancer Program, Monash University, Clayton, Australia; 2Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; 3Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 4Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories and Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men’s Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; 5Masonic Cancer Center & Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, U.S.A.; 6Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 7ACRF Department of Cancer Biology and Therapeutics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; 8Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia.
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Clinical validation of circulating cytokines as markers of prognosis and response to docetaxel in men with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer
1Chris O’Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, Australia; 2Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; 3University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Oncogenex Pharmaceuticals Inc, Bothell, WA, USA; 5Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK; 6University of British Columbia, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 7University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, Seattle, WA, USA; 8University of NSW, Sydney, Australia; 9National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre, Sydney, Australia; 10St Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; 11Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia; 12Calvary Mater, Newcastle, Australia; 13Coffs Harbour Hospital, Australia; 14Northern Haematology and Oncology Group, Sydney, Australia.
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LobSig, a prognostic signature for ILC
1UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, 4029, QLD, Australia; 2QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia; 3Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia; 4Wesley Breast Clinic, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066, Australia; 5Pathology Queensland, The Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Herston, 4029, QLD, Australia; 6Australian Breast Cancer Tissue Bank, Westmead, 2145, NSW, Australia.
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Androgen receptor activation in Endocrine-Resistant ER-positive breast cancer
1Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney NSW Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW Australia; 3Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA Australia. *These authors contributed equally to the work.
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Therapeutic targeting of Ezh2 enhances PD-1 blockade by induction of interferon gamma response
1Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 3Department of Health Informatics, Rutgers School of Health Professions, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Newark, NJ, USA; 4Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Laboratory of Genitourinary Cancer Pathogenesis, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA; 6Department of Urology, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 7Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 8The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA; 9Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 10Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 11Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, and Department of Urology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
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Lipid elongation in prostate cancer: an androgen regulated process and a novel therapeutic target
1University of Adelaide Medical School, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 2Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men’s Health, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 3South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia; 4KU Leuven- University of Leuven, LKI- Leuven Cancer Institute, Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Lipid Metabolism in Cancer, Leuven, Belgium; 5Translational Research Institute, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD 4001, Australia; 6Basil Hetzel Institute, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville South SA 5011, Australia.
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Novel role of CBF[beta] as a regulator of breast cancer phenotype, progression and metastasis
1School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 3RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Centre for Clinical Research, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
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Flicking the switch off, targeting MCL-1 in the treatment of breast and prostate cancer
1The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010, Australia; 3Chris O’Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, Australia; 4Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; 5University of NSW, Sydney, Australia; 6University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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Quest for the lost andromedin
Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver, Canada.
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Unravelling the role of cell plasticity in BrCa development and metastasis
1The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 5The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
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Extending genetic portraits of human prostate cancer
Pennsylvania Cancer and Regenerative Medicine Center, Baruch S Blumberg Institute, Pennsylvania, USA.
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Activation of p53 in combination with endocrine and CDK targeted therapies in ER+ breast cancer
1Garvan Institute of Medical Research and St Vincent’s Clinical School, Darlinghurst NSW, Australia; 2Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 3Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
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Epithelial mesenchymal transition, stromal density, and chemo-resistance in breast cancer (BrCa)
1Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Australia; 2The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 3Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; 4Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
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Single-cell transcriptomics reveals marked heterogeneity for intrinsic molecular subtype and cellular function in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer
1The Kinghorn Cancer Center and Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Sydney, Australia.
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A miR-194-regulated transcriptional network is associated with progression to androgen receptor-independent prostate cancer
1Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 2Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men’s Health, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia; 3Centre for Cancer Biology, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia.
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IL6/STAT3 co-opts ER regulatory elements to drive metastasis in breast cancer
1Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK; 2ISREC – Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, School of Life Sciences, Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), SV2.832 Station 19, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland; 3Nottingham Breast Cancer Research Centre, Division of Cancer and Stem Cells, Nottingham University and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK; 4Division of Oncogenomics, Oncode Institute, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK. *Equal contribution.
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Exploring the clinical significance of interactions between oestrogen and progesterone receptors in breast and endometrioid adenocarcinomas by proximity ligation assay
1Cancer Pathology Research Group, Mater Research Institute – The University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Queensland, Australia; 2Department of Anatomical Pathology, Mater Pathology, Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; 3Department of Medical Oncology, Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; 4Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; 5Mater Research Institute – The University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia; 6Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
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DNA demethylation agents as a therapeutic approach in endocrine-resistant breast cancer
1Epigenetics Research Laboratory, Genomics and Epigenetics Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; 2St Vincent’s Clinical School, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3The Kinghorn Cancer Center, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Australia.
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Preclinical development of CDDD3-14, a potent and selective inhibitor of CDK4/6 for the treatment of breast cancer
Drug Discovery and Development, University of South Australia Cancer Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia.
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Targeting HP1-alpha for prevention and treatment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer
Department of Urologic Sciences, Vancouver Prostate Centre, UBC, Canada.
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Novel and highly selective CDK9 inhibitors suppress proliferation of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells in vitro
1Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, SA 5000, Australia; 2School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, SA 5000, Australia.
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